What Diet Related Disease is 100,000% More Common Today Than A Century Ago?


Type 2 diabetes/prediabetes. But what exactly is it and what can be done about it?

If left untreated, insulin resistance turns into type 2 diabetes. To quickly understand type 2 diabetes, let’s go back to the example of the clogged sink. Type 2 diabetes is like running water into a clogged sink for so long that water overflows all over the place and the faucet breaks down. Once so much insulin is produced that it is overflowing our bloodstream while our ability to produce insulin has broken down, we have type 2 diabetes.

This build-up and breakdown causes potentially lethal havoc on the body. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates people diagnosed with diabetes by the age of forty die twelve years sooner if they are male, and fourteen years sooner if they are female.

 

Estimated Cases of Diabetes (in Millions)

 

 

“Just twenty years ago, the best information available suggested that 30 million people had diabetes. A bleaker picture has now emerged. Diabetes is fast becoming the epidemic of the 21st century.” – President Pierre Lefèbvre, International Diabetes Federation

 

Diabetic vs. Non-Diabetic Death Rate (Per 1k People)

 

 

“In 2007, diabetes affected an estimated 246 million people worldwide, with that number estimated to grow by 7 million per year. The highest rate of growth is expected to occur in developing countries. Of people with diabetes, 9 out of 10 have Type 2 Diabetes…Worldwide 3.8 million deaths are directly attributable to diabetes.” – Linda Rowland, in the Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine

 

Diabetic vs. Non-Diabetic Heart Attack Rate

 

 

Type 2 diabetes is terrible. What is even worse is its disturbing growth. In the late 1800s, one in every 4,000 people was diabetic; today one in every four people is diabetic or pre-diabetic. That is a 100,000% increase in one century, and researchers estimate that we are on our way to a third of men and nearly a half of women in the U.S. becoming type 2 diabetic. That is insane. That is caused by inSANE calories.

How do we avoid this?

Eat more. Exercise less. Smarter. Studies show 80% of type 2 diabetics can reduce or completely eliminate their need for medication by eating more SANEly, while reversing more than a third of a lifetime’s worth of insulin resistance after only a few months by exercising smarter.

Science has shown us the way…now it’s up to us to go SANE and get eccentric.


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